My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s August 2017 Wrap Up

The Walking Dead: Here’s Negan! by Robert Kirkman (★★★★)

Who is The Walking Dead‘s most enigmatic villain, and how exactly did he become the psychopathic dick we love to hate? Here’s Negan collects the origin story of the man, the myth, the terrible husband, including the creation of his weapon of choice: Lucille. Rushed at times, the prequel story suffers from its original format (it was released four pages at a time over 16 months and is far too short to fully explain this complex character), but won me over with some great Negan one-liners.

Spell on Wheels Vol. 1 by Kate Leth (★★★½)

Touted as Supernatural meets Buffy and The Craft, Spell on Wheels is about three fashionable young witches who go on an East Coast road trip to retrieve their stolen magical belongings. While the adorable artwork and two of the side adventures were super enjoyable — I’m looking at you goat man and haunted gal pals — I didn’t find the arc as a whole entirely successful. A real shame, since fashionable witches on a road trip  is basically my dream comic book series.

Eliza and Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia (★★★½)

In real life, Eliza Mirk is a painfully shy teenager with her nose stuck in a sketch book. Online, she’s LadyConstellation, the anonymous creator of the enormously popular webcomic Monstrous Sea. But when a Monstrous Sea fanfiction author moves to Eliza’s school, she’s forced to confront the real world and her self-imposed loneliness. A fun look at the world of fandom, Eliza and Her Monsters is, at its heart, a touching exploration of depression and anxiety.

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s August 2017 Bookstagram Wrap Up

Love looking at gorgeous book covers?

Allow me to introduce you to Bookstagram, a hashtag-based corner of Instagram — also called Instabook — where bibliophiles share their TBR piles, current reads and answer other bookish prompts!

Intrigued? You can check out all my August bookstagram photos below the cut!

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s July 2017 Wrap Up

Final Girls by Riley Sager (★★★★½)

A decade ago, Quincy Carpenter became a final girl, the sole survivor of a horror movie-esque massacre. Struggling to move past the title, Quincy is dragged back into the spotlight when one of her fellow final girls is found dead. Deemed “the first great thriller of 2017” by Stephen King, Riley Sager’s Final Girls is a suspenseful thrill ride that will have you guessing* until the very end.

*guessing wrong

love, and you by Gretchen Gomez (★★★½)

Much like Milk and Honey, I didn’t find love, and you nearly as fulfilling as The Princess Saves Herself in This One — both of which were recommended based on my fondness for Amanda Lovelace’s poetry. However, much like with the work of Rupi Kaur, Gomez has some really great and touching pieces toward the end of her collection.

The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee (★★★★½)

Lord Henry Montague (AKA Monty) is a fashionable rake about to embark on a Grand Tour of Europe alongside his best friend and the secret love of his life, Percy. It’s the 18th century road trip novel you never knew you wanted! While I greatly enjoyed Monty’s hijinks and his slow-burn romance with Percy, I was a little thrown by the strange, almost supernatural turn the story took.

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s July 2017 Bookstagram Wrap Up

Enjoy judging books by their covers?

Welcome to Bookstagram — also referred to as Instabook — a hashtag-based section of Instagram where bibliophiles show off their current reads, bookish collections and literary purchases.

While I have mostly moved away from Bookstagram challenges, because ain’t nobody got time for that, I have not abandoned you, Bookstagram! Head below the jump to see all my photos from July.

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s June 2017 Wrap Up

When It’s Real by Erin Watt (★★★★½)

The dynamic writing duo known collectively a Erin Watt are back with another poor girl falls in love with rich guy romance. This time around, 17-year-old Vaughan Bennett is forced to save her struggling family by pretending to be the girlfriend of famous pop star Oakley Ford (a Justin Bieber type). Will their fake love turn into real love? Don’t be stupid, of course it will.

A Long Conversation by Cassandra Clare (★★★½)

Shenanigans abound in this short story set during the tail end of Cassandra Clare’s Lady Midnight. Watch as all your fan favorites act totally out of character and do incredibly rude things like propose during someone else’s engagement party. While not a necessary read, this short story does bridge the gap between events in Lady Midnight and Lord of Shadows, so at least there’s that.

Assassin’s Heart by Sarah Ahiers (★★★½)

Set in a world where murder is commonplace and gods are real, Sarah Ahiers debut novel starts off incredibly strong, but the world building goes a bit too far when literal ghosts are introduced. Not to mention that horse named Butters. While I ultimately enjoyed the story and any non-ghostly world building, the novel was too uneven for my tastes.

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s June 2017 Bookstagram Wrap Up

Welcome to Bookstagram, a hashtag-based corner of of Instagram — also referred to as Instabook — where book lovers share their current reads, book hauls and photos of anything literary.

Check it out for yourself by perusing the #bookstagram or #instabook hashtags on Instagram.

Keep scrolling to see my June contributions to the Bookstagram community below!

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s May 2017 Wrap Up

Spill Zone by Scott Westerfeld (★★★★)

The first trade in a new graphic novel series by young adult author Scott Westerfeld takes place after a series of localized disasters around the globe bends reality itself. Full of terrifying and incredibly imaginative monsters, so-called Spill Zones around the world have turned former idyllic towns into nightmarish landscapes. Intriguingly plotted and beautifully colored, my only complaint is how quickly I devoured this.

The Dream Thieves by Maggie Stiefvater (★★★★)

Even though it was just as beautifully written as its predecessor, I had a lot of trouble getting into the second book in The Raven Cycle. Despite the extremely slow start however, The Dream Thieves ended up containing my favorite new character — the enigmatic Mr. Gray — and cemented my new favorite Raven Boy: Ronan. Just as predicted.

I Kill Giants by Joe Kelly (★★★★)

I didn’t know what to expect going into the soon-to-be adapted I Kill Giants, but I certainly didn’t anticipate being a crying mess by the end. While the graphic novel started off confusing, frustrating and a little too on the juvenile side for my tastes, I was blown away and incredibly touched by the final reveal. Get your hankies ready, because this one takes a hard left turn!

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