My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s December 2017 Wrap Up

The Disaster Artist by Greg Sestero and Tom Bissell (★★★★★)

The Disaster Artist is the unbelievably true story behind the making of The Room, the so-called worst movie ever made. Written by actor Greg Sestero — who plays The Room‘s Mark — the novel details his tumultuous friendship with the man, the myth, the enigma: Tommy Wiseau. With on-set tales that range from hilarious, to baffling, to downright awkward, this is a must-read for anyone who has ever seen the cult phenomenon that is The Room.

The Walking Dead Vol. 29: Lines We Cross by Robert Kirkman (★★★★)

An uneven and pretty slow arc, the 29th volume of The Walking Dead comic suffers slightly from a few snoretastic issues. Thankfully, a brand-new character named the Princess arrives to shake things up. To make matters better, the entire collection ends with a huge emotional bang 74 issues and five years in the making. Promise.

The Afterlife of Holly Chase by Cynthia Hand (★★★)

Sometimes you just need a dumb, mindless read, and The Afterlife of Holly Chase is exactly that. This young adult tale inspired by Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol follows former socialite and failed Scrooge Holly Chase, a ghost who is now being punished for her sins in life by the workers at Project Scrooge, who force her to become the Ghost of Christmas Past. Nonsensical and predictable, I had so much fun reading this stupid book.

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s March 2017 Wrap Up

Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman (★★★★½)

Interested in Norse mythology (or any mythology really) and love Neil Gaiman? Then this is the book for you! Master storyteller Neil Gaiman retells classic Norse myths, staying true to the original stories while breathing new life into the northern tales. Be warned, this is not the Marvel pantheon you know, this is Thor at his dumbest and Loki at his most chaotic. Ragnarök is coming.

Caraval by Stephanie Garber (★★★★½)

Marketed at fans of The Night Circus, Stephanie Garber’s debut novel is set in a world where lucky participants are invited to take part in an immersive performance slash magical game called Caraval. The winner will receive one wish, but at what cost? Full of characters you can’t trust, a fantastical new world and twists and turns you didn’t see coming, Caraval is a truly enchanting read. [WATCH BOOK CLUB DISCUSSION]

The Princess Diarist by Carrie Fisher (★★★★)

Carrie Fisher’s final autobiography explores the actress’ first few years as and the lasting legacy of the iconic Princess Leia, including her secret affair with actor Harrison Ford during the filming of Episode IV. Told in her own words, and the angsty teen poetry found in her recently unearthed Star Wars filming diary, this is Fisher at her most revealing.

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s March 2017 Bookstagram Wrap Up

Have a serious book cover addiction? You’re not alone!

Welcome to Bookstagram, a hashtag based corner of Instagram where bibliophiles take part in literary themed photo challenges, share their TBR and show off their current reads.

Last month I took part in absolutely zero Bookstagram challenges — partially because I was off gallivanting in Iceland, but mostly because I’m a failure — and instead played by my own rules.

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Hot Off the Proverbial Presses: November 19, 2013

Let Me Off at the Top! by Ron BurgundyLet Me Off at the Top! My Classy Life & Other Musings by Ron Burgundy

The autobiography every true American has been waiting for: a shockingly candid and raw confessional from a national treasure.

From his humble beginnings in a desolate Iowa coal mining town, his years at Our Lady Queen of Chewbacca High School to his odds-defying climb to the dizzying heights of becoming America’s most trusted and beloved television News Anchor, Ron Burgundy pulls no punches in Let Me Off at the Top!

In his very own words Burgundy reveals his most private thoughts, his triumphs and his disappointments. His life reads like an adventure story complete with knock down fights, beautiful women and double-fisted excitement on every page. He has hunted jackalopes with Bobby Kennedy and Peter Lawford, had more than his share of his amorous exploits, and formed the greatest on-air team in the history of televised news. Along the way, he hobnobbed with people you wish you knew and some you honestly wish you didn’t — celebrities, presidents, presidents’ wives, celebrities’ wives, dogs, and, of course Veronica Corningstone, the love of his life. Walter Cronkite, Barbra Streisand, Katie Couric, the list goes on. Who didn’t Mr. Burgundy, or “Ron” as he is known to his friends, rub elbows with in the course of his colorful and often criminal life?

This may well be the most thrilling book ever written, by a man of great physical, moral and spiritual strength and not surprisingly a great literary talent as well. This book deserves a real shot at a Pulitzer Prize. In fact if it doesn’t win one then we will finally have proof that the Pulitzer is rigged.

Ron Burgundy has taken the time to write a book. We owe it to him, as honest Americans, to read it.

WHY WE’RE EXCITED: WE’RE IN A GLASS CASE OF EMOTION!!!

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You’ve Come A Long Way Baby: Cassie-la Enthuses About “Bossypants” by Tina Fey

Bossypants by Tina Fey
Genre: Non-fiction, humor, autobiography, I think I just peed myself
Rating: 4.95 out of 5 stars

Summary: In her laugh out loud, no holds bar autobiography, former head “SNL” writer and “30 Rock” creator/star Tina Fey talks being a woman, a mother, and a workaholic.

From her early childhood to befriending closet homosexuals to her start in improvisational comedy and eventual rise to stardom, Fey writes with every bit of wit and sass that makes her so damn lovable on screen. You’ll laugh, you’ll laugh some more, and you may inadvertently wet yourself in the process.

Tina Fey is not afraid to make fun of herself. This is the first thing that became apparent when I saw the book cover for Bossypants. She may be an actress who makes enough money to afford a nanny (who she refers to as her babysitter or in one instance Coordinator of Toddlery) but ultimately she’s a down to earth woman who isn’t shy of presenting the world for what it is.

As far as expectations go, I assumed her autobiography would be very similar to Sarah Silverman’s, The Bedwetter: Stories of Courage, Redemption, and Pee. This was unfair of me. It was unfair to assume that just because both of these writers are female comedians that their autobiographies would be in some way congruent. Whereas Silverman’s novel taught me that she is a loose, social outcast with poor fashion decisions and no qualms about spitting out various racial epithets and/or references to vaginas, Fey’s novel was ultimately more fulfilling. While they both talk about their rise into the public eye (by starting low in the comedy world with other now also famous comedians), Fey presents her story in a much more intellectual way.

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