Blog Tour: ‘Bright Burning Stars’ by A.K. Small (Excerpt)

The standalone young adult novel Bright Burning Stars by A.K. Small hits shelves next Tuesday, May 21, but we’re celebrating a little early with a sneak peak at the contemporary ballet drama!

Set at a prestigious ballet school in Paris, Bright Burning Stars is a lushly written boarding school drama about two best friends who will do whatever it takes to win “the Prize” … even if it means losing each other on their way to the top.

Ready to learn more about Small’s debut novel? Keep reading for an excerpt from the very first chapter, and pre-order a copy today!

Spoilers: we gave this one a five on Goodreads, so you’re in for a treat.

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s March 2019 Wrap Up

Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn (★★★★)

Flynn’s debut novel is a somewhat predictable thriller starring damaged narrator Camille Preaker, a journalist who returns to her hometown — and her even more damaged family — to report on a missing child and a recent child murder. Super dark and incredibly disturbing, Sharp Objects is not for the faint of heart. Trigger warnings for cutting, suicide, child murder, animal abuse, child abuse, and pretty much everything in between.

Vox by Christina Dalcher (★★★★½)

Described as The Handmaid’s Tale for a new era, Vox takes place in a horrifying near future where women are limited to 100 words a day. Similar to Atwood’s tale, Dalcher’s America turns downright dystopian when it’s taken over by an ultra religious political party, with women quickly losing the right to work, read, or own property. While a little rushed toward the end, I had a hard time putting down this cautionary tale, which draws very obvious parallels to our current political climate.

the mermaid’s voice returns in this one by Amanda Lovelace (★★★★)

The third and final poetry collection in the women are some kind of magic series is here, and comes complete with individual poetry from 13 of Lovelace’s peers. While I enjoyed this collection — which once again delves into Lovelace’s painful past — I found it to be the weakest of the three, with the witch doesn’t burn in this one, followed closely by the princess saves herself in this one being my top two.Read More »

My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s February 2019 Wrap Up

Our Kind of Cruelty by Araminta Hall (★★★★)

Somewhat reminiscent of You, Our Kind of Cruelty is told entirely from the male POV, and (spoilers), the boy is not alright. The story’s unreliable narrator is Michael Hayes, who pens the suspenseful tale of how he lost the love of his life, Verity, all while desperately trying to win her back. Written “in a mad spurt of anger at the continued injustices perpetrated against women in our so-called civilized society,” Hall’s compulsively readable thriller will have you screaming about the importance of actually listening to women.

The Favorite Sister by Jessic Knoll (★★★)

I was super excited to dive into The Favorite Sister, which is a murder mystery/thriller that follows the stars of a reality show centered around successful businesswomen. Especially since I had heard such good things about Knoll’s debut novel Luckiest Girl Alive. Unfortunately what I got was frustratingly slow plot, extremely unlikable women with unbelievable secrets, and chapters that are way. Too. Long. Womp womp.

When Life Gives You Lululemons by Lauren Weisberger (★★★½)

The third book in the Devil Wears Prada series follows fan favorite Emily — as well as two new POVs you’ll care slightly less about — and will have you wondering, “Why is there more than one book again?” This time around the action takes place in the suburbs of Greenwich, Connecticut, and seems to be under the misguided impression that all women only need two things to be happy: a slamming body and offspring. Emily deserved so much better.

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