My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s October 2018 Wrap Up

The Last Time I Lied by Riley Sager (★★★★½)

The suspenseful follow-up to Final Girls tells the story of Emma, another survivor of trauma (Sager’s forte). 15 years after the disappearance of her Camp Nightingale cabin mates, Emma returns to the hoity-toity summer camp to learn what happened to Vivian, Natalie, and Allison all those years ago. Perfect for fans of psychological thrillers, Sager’s latest novel will keep you guessing (and screaming) until the very last page. Adapt this for the big screen, please and thanks.

I Am Not Your Final Girl by Claire C. Holland (★★★★)

This debut collection from Claire C. Holland combines two of my favorite things: feminist poetry and fictional final girls. Written in response to the 2016 election and the #MeToo movement (among other unfathomable goings on in the world), Holland’s poems explore the perspective of 40 female horror film survivors throughout the decades. Deeply unapologetic, this debut collection is a fitting tribute to final girls and the society that shapes them.

You by Caroline Kepnes (★★★★★)

Kepnes’ debut thriller is an incredibly disturbing novel about obsession in the social media age, including the unhealthy fixation we have with curating our own online personas. Full disclosure, I should not have enjoyed this dark and deranged novel told in the second person as much as I did. And I especially should not have been rooting for the charming, literary loving stalker/kidnapper/murderer the entire time. But here we are. Insert Sorry Not Sorry joke here.

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s September 2018 Wrap Up

The Towering Sky by Katherine MgGee (★★★½)

The final (and weakest) novel in The Thousandth Floor trilogy isn’t nearly as exciting or as high stakes as the first two books, and it definitely doesn’t feature as much fun, futuristic technology. From an unnecessarily long plot, to a very predictable conclusion, this is one trilogy that should have been a duology … or maybe even a standalone. Despite my numerous complaints, this is not a terrible read, but I wanted so much more than unnecessary will-they-won’t-they romantic drama.

Obsidio by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff (★★★★☆)

Obsidio, the conclusion to The Illuminae Files, brings all your favorite characters — and let’s face it, some not so great new ones — together at last. While there are no horror elements like in the first two books, the plot more than makes up for it with some amazing AIDAN moments, the inclusion of comic book elements and illustrations, and a glorious and super experimental final battle. It’s certainly not the best book in the series, but it definitely goes out with a bang.

To Make Monsters Out of Girls by Amanda Lovelace (★★★½)

This collection of previously released Wattpad poetry has been re-edited to form a brand-new Amanda Lovelace duology titled Things That H(a)unt. While not as empowering as the rest of Lovelace’s collections, this one is still super raw and emotional, and features amazing opening and closing poems (the strongest of the bunch). Bonus: it’s her prettiest collection, and has beautiful illustrations throughout.

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Creator Q&A: ‘The Mechanic’ Author Ian Evans and Illustrator Loriana Takacs

Writer and teacher Ian Evans has created something truly unique: The Mechanic, an existential poem that’s illustrated to mimic a one-shot comic book.

The illustrated verse centers around the titular mechanic, who dwells on his life while working on a vehicle. According to the author, “it is a dark, psychological character study revolving around the theme of how the routines of a mundane life come into conflict with the desire to leave a lasting impact on the world.

To learn more about this unique work, we had a virtual chat with the author himself, and the comic’s illustrator Loriana Takacs, who are in the process of funding their intriguing project through Kickstarter.

Head below the jump for the full Q&A!

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s March 2018 Wrap Up

The Witch Doesn’t Burn in This One by Amanda Lovelace (★★★★★)

Lovelace’s second –and in my opinion superior — poetry collection in the Women Are Some Kind of Magic series is a love letter to feminism and all the nasty women of the world. Once again split into four parts (The Trial, The Burning, The Firestorm and the Ashes), this time around Lovelace takes aim at a broken patriarchal system through the lens of a witch hunt, inspiring and motivating readers through her quotable poetry.

Opal: A Raven Cycle Story by Maggie Stiefvater (★★★½)

This short story follow up to The Raven King focuses on Ronan (the best raven boy), Adam (the okayest raven boy) and their dream made sort of love child Opal as the trio plans to create a brand-new Cabeswater. Told from Opal’s perspective, this is the coda The Raven Cycle deserved, now with 100% more adorably domestic Ronan/Adam moments.

The Wicked Deep by Shea Ernshaw (★★★★½)

Every summer in the town of Sparrow three accused witches return from the dead to seek their revenge, taking over the bodies of three young girls and luring men to their deaths. Moody, suspenseful and atmospheric, The Wicked Deep is set in the seemingly magical town of Sparrow (they sell cakes that make you forget), whose dark past is now a successful tourist attraction. One room facing the haunted ocean please!

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