My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s July 2018 Wrap Up

Scream All Night by Derek Milman (★★★½)

On the outside, Scream All Night looks like a horror novel, but twist: it’s actually a coming of age story. The YA debut follows emancipated teen Dario, who is forced back into the family business (which just so happens to be his father’s B-horror movie film studio). Full of an eccentric cast of characters and some tough subject matter, Milman’s novel explores what happens when the monsters are found behind the camera. [Read our creator Q&A with author Derek Milman.]

Nyxia by Scott Reintgen (★★★★★)

I loved this super fast-paced science fiction story more than I ever could have imagined. Full of complex characters and shocking twists and turns, Nyxia features a definitely evil corporation who are taking young people to another planet to mine a mysterious material know as Nyxia. What could go wrong? Since this is the first book in the series, it’s focused solely on the kid’s training before arriving on Eden, a second earth-like planet inhabited by humanoid creatures known as Adamites.

The Traitor’s Kiss by Erin Beaty (★★★½)

The Traitor’s Kiss started off super promising, but unfortunately, things got real dumb real fast, and the story completely lost me toward the end. Set during an indistinguishable time period where everyone has to be paired by a matchmaker, this book definitely should have been a standalone novel. While things start off great with the matchmaking stuff, this far superior/way more interesting section was mostly glossed over to make way for a time jump and some nonsensical plot about spies and secret princes for no reason.

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s April 2017 Wrap Up

A Court of Mist and Fury (★★★★★) and Wings and Embers by Sarah J. Maas (★★★★)

My favorite book of 2016 was an even better re-read! Tackled in preparation for A Court of Wings and Ruin (more on that below), I also used April to finally check out the Nesta/Cassian short story Wings and Embers, which was good but not ACOMAF good. Let’s be honest though, is anything ACOMAF good? [READ FULL REVIEW] [WATCH BOOK CLUB DISCUSSION]

We Are Okay by Nina LaCour (★★★★½)

My first book by Nina LaCour, We Are Okay was the perfect story to get me out of my post ACOMAF reading slump. An intimate and honest look at grief, We Are Okay bounces between Marin’s life pre and post-tragedy, and the family who is desperately trying to make her feel whole again. Get your hankies out, because this slice of life contemporary novel will give you all the feels.

Literally by Lucy Keating (★★★☆☆)

Lucy Keating’s sophomore novel may have the exact same premise as Stranger Than Fiction, but trust me, it’s no Stranger Than Fiction. The story revolves around Annabelle, a teenager with a perfect life who realizes she’s trapped inside a novel written by author Lucy Keating. It could work, but it doesn’t. Super contrived and over the top, there’s nothing worse than Lucy Keating writing about how great Lucy Keating is.

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s May 2016 Wrap Up

May 2016 Wrap Up

Sleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel (★★★★☆)

After a brief struggle with the first 100 pages of Sleeping Giants, I found myself fully committed to Neuvel’s plot involving ancient aliens and a giant robot. Told through a series of interviews and journal entries, the first book in the Themis Files is an exciting tale full of science, mysteries, mythology and a touch of humor, all collected by the enigmatic man at the center of it all. [READ FULL REVIEW]

A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas (★★★★★)

Sarah J. Maas has really stepped up her game with the second book in the A Court of Thorns and Roses series. A Hades and Persephone retelling, ACOMAF has tons more world building, even more amazing characters and a beautiful slow burn romance that will have you experiencing every possible emotion. I didn’t think I was going to survive the ending, and I don’t know how I’m going to wait a year to find out what happens next. [WATCH BOOK CLUB DISCUSSION] [READ FULL REVIEW]

Happily Ever After: A Companion to the Selection Series by Kiera Cass (★★★½)

Even though reading every short story tied to a young adult series seems like a chore, I keep torturing myself anyway out of some weird sense of obligation. As with most short story/novella bind-ups, I liked some of the tales in Happily Ever After and suffered through others. I did however appreciate the illustrations that went along with each story — even the ones I loathed.

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