My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s April 2017 Wrap Up

A Court of Mist and Fury (★★★★★) and Wings and Embers by Sarah J. Maas (★★★★)

My favorite book of 2016 was an even better re-read! Tackled in preparation for A Court of Wings and Ruin (more on that below), I also used April to finally check out the Nesta/Cassian short story Wings and Embers, which was good but not ACOMAF good. Let’s be honest though, is anything ACOMAF good? [READ FULL REVIEW] [WATCH BOOK CLUB DISCUSSION]

We Are Okay by Nina LaCour (★★★★½)

My first book by Nina LaCour, We Are Okay was the perfect story to get me out of my post ACOMAF reading slump. An intimate and honest look at grief, We Are Okay bounces between Marin’s life pre and post-tragedy, and the family who is desperately trying to make her feel whole again. Get your hankies out, because this slice of life contemporary novel will give you all the feels.

Literally by Lucy Keating (★★★☆☆)

Lucy Keating’s sophomore novel may have the exact same premise as Stranger Than Fiction, but trust me, it’s no Stranger Than Fiction. The story revolves around Annabelle, a teenager with a perfect life who realizes she’s trapped inside a novel written by author Lucy Keating. It could work, but it doesn’t. Super contrived and over the top, there’s nothing worse than Lucy Keating writing about how great Lucy Keating is.

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s August 2016 Wrap Up

August 2016 Book Wrap Up

The Princess Saves Herself in This One by Amanda Lovelace (★★★★★)

Broken into four different parts (the Princess, the Damsel, the Queen and You), Amanda Lovelace’s beautifully moving poetry collection is part memoir, part feminist tale and part motivational speech. Get your pens (and your hankies) ready, because you will want to underline the hell out of this thought provoking read.

The Assassin and the Empire: A Throne of Glass Novella by Sarah J. Maas (★★★★☆)

You knew it was coming, the final devastating story in The Assassin’s Blade bind up. While I did appreciate the brief foray into Arobynn’s insanely manipulative mental process at the end of the story (you deserve everything you have coming your way sir), I didn’t necessarily need to read about the traumatic ending to all things Celaena and Sam.

The Thousandth Floor by Katharine McGee (★★★★½)

What if Gossip Girl and Pretty Little Liars had a baby? A futuristic baby. Then you would definitely be reading Katharine McGee’s debut novel The Thousandth Floor. Set in the year 2118, this first in a series re-imagines life if Manhattan were a giant thousandth floor skyscraper, exploring the glamorous lives of the Tower’s elite and the not so posh citizens who live miles below them. [READ FULL REVIEW]

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Who Reads Short Shorts? Cassie-la Gives the Run Down on S.G. Browne’s New Short Stories

SG Browne Short Story Covers

S.G. Browne is one of my instabuy authors, and has held a special place in my reading heart since I got my hands on his first novel Breathers: A Zombie’s Lament way back in 2009.

Not so fun fact: reviews for all of but his first tome exist here on Bibliomantics starting in 2011 when my writing skills were mediocre at best. What I’m saying is, don’t judge me too harshly if you choose to dig back into those.

Anyway, when Browne contacted me to review his latest three short stories I was all in, even more so when I saw their subject matter ranged from monster college to retired supervillains and kaiju.

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