My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s December 2018 Wrap Up

The Dreamers by Karen Thompson Walker (★★★½)

This super original novel — Walker’s sophomore follow up to The Age of Miracles — explores a mysterious illness that quickly infects residents of an allegedly cursed college town in California, trapping the infected in a perpetual state of sleep. With a premise that’s as intriguing as her first novel (if you’re not in the know, it’s set in a world where the earth’s rotation begins to gradually slow down), it’s no surprise that I was immediately hooked. Pick up The Dreamers for the unique story, stay for the beautiful prose.

Truly Devious by Maureen Johnson (★★★★½)

True crime enthusiast Stevie is determined to solve the decades-old murder and kidnapping at the prestigious Ellingham Academy boarding school. With a story that alternates between the present day and the events of 1936, when Albert Ellingham’s wife and daughter were kidnapped, Johnson’s new series is a fun-page turner full of a lovable cast of weirdos and several intriguing mysteries to solve. The only downside? The book ends on a major cliffhanger that will leave you wanting so much more.

My Boyfriend is a Bear by Pamela Robin (★★★★)

Much like Hot Tub Time Machine, you know exactly what you’re getting with this graphic novel. Starring a cutesy girl named Nora who happens to be dating a bear, My Boyfriend is a Bear is a surprisingly adorable story with even more adorable artwork from artist Cat Farris. A little weird at times (for obvious bear on human reasons), this graphic novel may be a metaphor for prejudices and the way that opposites attract … but also might not be a metaphor at all? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s November 2018 Wrap Up

A Conjuring of Light by V.E. Schwab (★★★★★)

I was not emotionally prepared for the conclusion of the Shades of Magic series, which features the darkest and most high-stakes story yet. In true book hangover fashion, my heart still aches over this beautifully written and perfectly plotted final book. Picking up where the cliffhanger in A Gathering of Shadows left off, A Conjuring of Light does not let down in the world- and character-building department. Read: you will not be disappointed. This book deserves all the stars, and has me even more stoked for the comic book spin-off series The Steel Prince.

Tower of Dawn by Sarah J. Maas (★★★★½)

I was very cautious (and also super annoyed) going into Tower of Dawn, because honestly, who wants an entire Chaol book? Thankfully, I was proven completely wrong … but only after I powered through the slow opening. After those first 200-ish pages, it was full stream ahead for the remainder of the novel, with the penultimate book in the Throne of Glass series even — dare I say it? — redeeming Chaol. The story’s success is due in large part to healer Yrene, who makes her triumphant return to the series, as well as some pretty shocking reveals that set the stage for the series conclusion (review below).

The Gentleman’s Guide to Getting Lucky by Mackenzi Lee (★★★★)

Monty, Percy, Felicity and their pirate friends return in this cute, fluffy follow up to The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue. Set before the events in The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy, Lee’s short story length tale follows Monty and Percy as they settle into their new relationship. There’s only one problem: despite Monty’s reputation as a rake, he and Percy have yet to be intimate with one another. With that knowledge weighing heavily on him, Monty turns to Felicity for help. What could go right?

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s October 2018 Wrap Up

The Last Time I Lied by Riley Sager (★★★★½)

The suspenseful follow-up to Final Girls tells the story of Emma, another survivor of trauma (Sager’s forte). 15 years after the disappearance of her Camp Nightingale cabin mates, Emma returns to the hoity-toity summer camp to learn what happened to Vivian, Natalie, and Allison all those years ago. Perfect for fans of psychological thrillers, Sager’s latest novel will keep you guessing (and screaming) until the very last page. Adapt this for the big screen, please and thanks.

I Am Not Your Final Girl by Claire C. Holland (★★★★)

This debut collection from Claire C. Holland combines two of my favorite things: feminist poetry and fictional final girls. Written in response to the 2016 election and the #MeToo movement (among other unfathomable goings on in the world), Holland’s poems explore the perspective of 40 female horror film survivors throughout the decades. Deeply unapologetic, this debut collection is a fitting tribute to final girls and the society that shapes them.

You by Caroline Kepnes (★★★★★)

Kepnes’ debut thriller is an incredibly disturbing novel about obsession in the social media age, including the unhealthy fixation we have with curating our own online personas. Full disclosure, I should not have enjoyed this dark and deranged novel told in the second person as much as I did. And I especially should not have been rooting for the charming, literary loving stalker/kidnapper/murderer the entire time. But here we are. Insert Sorry Not Sorry joke here.

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s September 2018 Wrap Up

The Towering Sky by Katherine MgGee (★★★½)

The final (and weakest) novel in The Thousandth Floor trilogy isn’t nearly as exciting or as high stakes as the first two books, and it definitely doesn’t feature as much fun, futuristic technology. From an unnecessarily long plot, to a very predictable conclusion, this is one trilogy that should have been a duology … or maybe even a standalone. Despite my numerous complaints, this is not a terrible read, but I wanted so much more than unnecessary will-they-won’t-they romantic drama.

Obsidio by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff (★★★★☆)

Obsidio, the conclusion to The Illuminae Files, brings all your favorite characters — and let’s face it, some not so great new ones — together at last. While there are no horror elements like in the first two books, the plot more than makes up for it with some amazing AIDAN moments, the inclusion of comic book elements and illustrations, and a glorious and super experimental final battle. It’s certainly not the best book in the series, but it definitely goes out with a bang.

To Make Monsters Out of Girls by Amanda Lovelace (★★★½)

This collection of previously released Wattpad poetry has been re-edited to form a brand-new Amanda Lovelace duology titled Things That H(a)unt. While not as empowering as the rest of Lovelace’s collections, this one is still super raw and emotional, and features amazing opening and closing poems (the strongest of the bunch). Bonus: it’s her prettiest collection, and has beautiful illustrations throughout.

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