My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s November 2017 Book Haul

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s October 2017 Wrap Up

The Hazel Wood by Melissa Albert (★★★★★)

A dark horror fantasy, Albert’s debut novel is about a fairy tale author turned cult phenomenon, and her granddaughter Alice, who has been raised as far away from everything to do with Althea Proserpine and the Tales from the Hinterland as possible. That is until her mother is kidnapped and she’s forced to learn the horrible truth of her past. From the dark fairy stories within the book, to a trip to a magical land and a journey of self-discovery, The Hazel Wood is three amazing tales all rolled up in one.

My Best Friend’s Exorcism by Grady Hendrix (★★★½)

Both funny and horrifying, Grady Hendrix’s re-released novel is one giant walk down nostalgia lane, but with 100% more demonic possession. Abby and Gretchen have been best friends since a disastrous roller rink party, that is until Gretchen goes missing one night and returns possessed by a demon. With everyone else snowed by Demon Gretchen, it is up to Abby to save her bestie with the power of friendship.

Deep Dark Fears and The Creeps by Fran Krause (★★★★)

The Deep Dark Fears collection is a humorous look at humanity’s strangest and darkest fears. A webcomic turned into two collected editions, Deep Dark Fears and The Creeps are unique looks at strangers’ most horrifying and baseless fears, submitted through Tumblr and illustrated by Krause himself. Get ready to feel slightly less crazy!

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s July 2017 Wrap Up

Final Girls by Riley Sager (★★★★½)

A decade ago, Quincy Carpenter became a final girl, the sole survivor of a horror movie-esque massacre. Struggling to move past the title, Quincy is dragged back into the spotlight when one of her fellow final girls is found dead. Deemed “the first great thriller of 2017” by Stephen King, Riley Sager’s Final Girls is a suspenseful thrill ride that will have you guessing* until the very end.

*guessing wrong

love, and you by Gretchen Gomez (★★★½)

Much like Milk and Honey, I didn’t find love, and you nearly as fulfilling as The Princess Saves Herself in This One — both of which were recommended based on my fondness for Amanda Lovelace’s poetry. However, much like with the work of Rupi Kaur, Gomez has some really great and touching pieces toward the end of her collection.

The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee (★★★★½)

Lord Henry Montague (AKA Monty) is a fashionable rake about to embark on a Grand Tour of Europe alongside his best friend and the secret love of his life, Percy. It’s the 18th century road trip novel you never knew you wanted! While I greatly enjoyed Monty’s hijinks and his slow-burn romance with Percy, I was a little thrown by the strange, almost supernatural turn the story took.

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s October 2016 Wrap Up

october-2016-book-wrap-up

The Grownup by Gillian Flynn (★★★★½)

I can understand why people feel lukewarm toward The Grownup. Aside from the ridiculous price point, we were promised a ghost story and we weren’t given a ghost story — not exactly. Instead, what we got was a well-written psychological story with one hell of a twist. And I for one can’t really complain about that.

Penpal by Dathan Auerbach (★★★☆☆)

This creepypasta turned novel could have been great. Unfortunately, a non-linear narrative, way too many descriptive elements and all the filler made what could have been a superbly creepy horror story way less creepy. While I ultimately liked it and some of its chilling turns, Penpal has plenty of falts. Still curious? Read the shorter online version — which makes way more sense structurally — instead.

A Head Full of Ghosts by Paul Tremblay (★★★★½)

In this modern day exorcism story, a teenage girl and her family become the subjects of a reality television show called The Possession. Named for a Bad Religion song, and partially inspired by The Yellow Wallpaper — with a dash of We Have Always Lived in the Castle thrown in — A Head Full of Ghosts will leave you with more questions than answers.Read More »