My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s February 2018 Wrap Up

Speak: The Graphic Novel by Laurie Halse Anderson (★★★)

Beautifully illustrated by Emily Carroll, this graphic novel adaptation of Speak re-imagines the classic novel for a new generation, complete with modern technology. Perfect for fans of the original, or someone who has yet to read the prose version, Anderson’s young adult story about finding your voice is even more prevalent for those growing up in the midst of the Time’s Up and Me Too movements.

Exit West by Mohsin Hamid (★★★½)

Sadly, Exit West was not what I anticipated. I was super excited to read about magical doors that take their users to far away places (the main reasons I picked up this novel), but was disappointed when the doors did not go to other dimensions. But mostly, I just found the overly extended sentences to be tiresome.

Glitter by Aprilynne Pike (★★★☆)

Despite having a somewhat unlikable heroine who makes the worst decisions imaginable, Glitter is still an exciting ride that combines the decadence and fashion of Marie Antoinette’s court with fun, futuristic technology. Does this combo make any sense? Not really. Is it still an enjoyable and fast-paced read regardless? Absolutely.

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s 2017 Wrap Up

2017 may have ended over two weeks ago, but due to a prolonged (and continuing) fight with a never-ending cold, I didn’t get around to wrapping up my new favorites and biggest disappointments of the year … until now.

In 2017 — the year of the dumpster fire, not to be confused with the original year of the dumpster fire: 2016 — I completed all five of my reading challenges and accomplished my goal of starting and finishing 100 books.

Keep scrolling to check out the best and worst books I read in 2017, or head to GoodReads to see a visual list of all the books (the good, the bad and the in-between) I read last year.

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s December 2017 Wrap Up

The Disaster Artist by Greg Sestero and Tom Bissell (★★★★★)

The Disaster Artist is the unbelievably true story behind the making of The Room, the so-called worst movie ever made. Written by actor Greg Sestero — who plays The Room‘s Mark — the novel details his tumultuous friendship with the man, the myth, the enigma: Tommy Wiseau. With on-set tales that range from hilarious, to baffling, to downright awkward, this is a must-read for anyone who has ever seen the cult phenomenon that is The Room.

The Walking Dead Vol. 29: Lines We Cross by Robert Kirkman (★★★★)

An uneven and pretty slow arc, the 29th volume of The Walking Dead comic suffers slightly from a few snoretastic issues. Thankfully, a brand-new character named the Princess arrives to shake things up. To make matters better, the entire collection ends with a huge emotional bang 74 issues and five years in the making. Promise.

The Afterlife of Holly Chase by Cynthia Hand (★★★)

Sometimes you just need a dumb, mindless read, and The Afterlife of Holly Chase is exactly that. This young adult tale inspired by Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol follows former socialite and failed Scrooge Holly Chase, a ghost who is now being punished for her sins in life by the workers at Project Scrooge, who force her to become the Ghost of Christmas Past. Nonsensical and predictable, I had so much fun reading this stupid book.

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My Year in Reading: Cassie-la’s September 2017 Wrap Up

Nevernight by Jay Kristoff (★★½)

Be warned, Nevernight is not your grandma’s fantasy revenge novel. The first in a new series from Jay Kristoff, Nevernight follows a bad ass orphan named Mia who is on a quest to avenge her family. A quest that takes her to the famed Red Church, where would-be assassins are trained by the world’s deadliest killers. It’s basically if Arya went to Hogwarts, but with even more murder. And more humorous footnotes.

The Dazzling Heights by Katharine McGee (★★☆)

The sequel to The Thousandth Floor, The Dazzling Heights is a slightly less fun version of its predecessor, but is still 100% future Gossip Girl. From an intriguing new character to a new murder mystery, McGee’s latest novel is a fun and frothy diversion from real life that suffers from too many POVs and the loss of the best character in the series (because they didn’t survive book one).

Invictus by Ryan Graudin (★★★★★)

This standalone young adult novel — are those making a comeback!?! — from Ryan Graudin has it all: time travel heists, period clothing, paradoxes, teen romances and red pandas. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, and for once, you’ll be upset that it’s only one book. Don’t let the cover scare you away, Invictus is the super fun and super smart young adult novel you should have read yesterday.

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